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Understanding each other’s feel

Roger Glover and Ian Paice, Kingston, Ont., Canada, February 9 2012; © Nick Soveiko CC-BY-NC-SA

What makes a great rhythm section?

MusicRadar has a preview of the Greatest Ever Rhythm section feature to appear in July issue of the Rhythm magazine.

Roger Glover:

A great drummer. When I first played with Paicey my first impression was that he was just fluid and effortless. Most drummers back then were metronomic, they were there to just keep time, where as Paicey wasn’t like that. Not only did he keep time but the way he played was as much of the music as bass, guitar and keyboards. Very early on, it might have even been the first time that we played together, he had a word in my ear. He said, “By the way, I don’t follow, I lead.’ I said, ‘Ah, got it.’ I learnt very quickly to just tuck in with him. His feel is like no other drummer I’ve ever known.

Ian Paice:

An understanding, understanding each other’s feel and there being a dominant and non-dominant partner. With Roger and I, Roger is happy to give me extra space, he might give me 20 percent so he has 30 percent and I have 70 percent. When I played with Glenn Hughes, he took us 50 percent and then some more because that’s the way he plays and there’s nothing wrong with that.

July issue of the magazine can be purchased online for £6.99 including worldwide delivery (£4.99 UK / £5.99 Europe).

Thanks to Andrey Gusenkov for the info.



18 Comments to “Understanding each other’s feel”:

  1. 1
    T says:

    The importance of a good drummer cannot be understated.

    As a guitarist, I am inspired by the drumming–both in performance and in composition. The rhythm section is the foundation of a good song, and the drummer is responsible for that first indication–that kernel–of an idea. Without that push, it is very difficult to put something together of quality. A guitarist can come up with a riff, but it will be the drummer to take that and give it the edge and point it into a direction.

    Ian Paice was never a flashy drummer. He plays very cleanly, extremely consistently, and holds to Glover’s mantra of keeping a firm rhythm going when all hell is breaking loose.

    When he solos, however, he is unbeatable. His use of dynamics is greater than anyone I can think of, but his playing is never trite or showy. I get tired of watching most drummers bang around on the drums, but when Paicey solos, it’s always entertaining. The Third Movement of the Concerto is one of my favorites.

    Ian Paice is also someone–despite his lack of “flash”–that you can tell it is he who is playing without seeing him. That is very difficult for a drummer. Most drummers are anonymous, but you always know it’s Ian Paice.

  2. 2
    HardRockPete says:

    The best rythmsection the world has ever heard within hard rock, Paice and Glover 🙂 They really are great 😀 As in GREAT!

  3. 3
    Tracy (Zero the Hero) Heyder says:

    Great read, even though short and incomplete due to the article as a whole being closed to a purchase. Would love to read it all…..but. That being said, the main thing to take from this snippet is that the one thing that has kept them together as they are, is respect and the fact they do well playing off each other. That’s the magic for long term. It’s proven. All the other MKs only lasted a couple of years each. Too much ego vs drama vs selfish vs lack of discipline. Now it’s all good, and has been since 1994. Longest Purple run. Mk7 ran 8 years. Mk8 is on 11 and still going.

    Ch-BeerZ?!

  4. 4
    Mike Eriksson says:

    Paice interview in Drum! magazine right now, he´s got the cover (see link, my blog). Lots of Purple in the media right now. MIKE
    http://trinkelbonker.wordpress.com/2013/06/13/purple-in-the-media/

  5. 5
    al says:

    @3 Tracy what up bud ? Have you had a chance to listen to the song Carry on …Jon ? Blackmore is a genius!It it is a shame that he doesn’t leave the missus at home and make another rock album.It brings tears in my eyes the end and the interaction btw Guitar-organ.
    on the other hand I don’t see any North American dates for this year,at least until November,I think we have to wait until 2014 for that (deep purple )
    Cheers !

  6. 6
    Les Hedger says:

    The way Paice pushes the other with his drumming, plus the way Roger holds the whole thing together (especially during the long solo’s in the 1970’s) was and is incredible!!

  7. 7
    Roberto says:

    @1 what do you mean with “lack of flash”?

  8. 8
    cyclone says:

    I agree with “T.” Most drummers dramatize their fast playing while IP just seems effortless when he plays…my favorite drummer. As for power… I like CozyP. he looked good playing like a madman.

  9. 9
    Deeperpurps says:

    Well friends, I bought a copy of the July 2013 issue of RHYTHM – “The UK’s Best Selling Drum Magazine” with the main feature “The Greatest Ever Rhythm Sections”.

    I was initially very pleased to see that on page 7 Deep Purple get a 2 page article about Now What?!. So then I proceeded to the big showcase article to go through the countdown from #25 to the #1 rhythm sections ever. Here they are for your reading pleasure:

    25- Dave Lovering & Kim Deal of THE PIXIES
    24- Tony Thompson & Bernard Evans of CHIC
    23- Mick Fleetwood & John McVie of FLEEETWOOD MAC
    22- Mitch Mitchell & Noel Redding of JIMI HENDRIX EXPERIENCE
    21- Dave Grohl & Krist Novoselic of NIRVANA
    20- Charlie Watts & Bill Wyman of the ROLLING STONES
    19- Alan “Reni” Wren & Gary “Mani” Mounfield of THE STONE ROSES
    18- Brad Wilk & Time Commerford of RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE
    17- Nick Mason & Roger Waters of PINK FLOYD
    16- Hal Blaine & Carol Kaye of THE WRECKING CREW
    15- Phil Rudd & Cliff Williams of AC/DC
    14- Roger Taylor & John Deacon of QUEEN
    13- Lars Ulrich & Cliff Burton of METALLICA
    12- Sly Dunbar & Robbie Shakespeare of SLY & ROBBIE
    11- Ginger Baker & Jack Bruce of CREAM
    10- Bill Ward & Geezer Butler of BLACK SABBATH
    09- Ringo Starr & Paul McCartney of THE BEATLES
    08- The Funk Brothers of TAMLA MOTOWN
    07- Nicko McBrain & Steve Harris of IRON MAIDEN
    06- Mike Portnoy & John Myung of DREAM THEATER
    05- Keith Moon & John Entwistle of THE WHO
    04- Chad Smith & Flea of RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS
    03- Steward Copeland & Sting of THE POLICE
    02- John Bonham & John Paul Jones of LED ZEPPELIN
    01- Neil Peart & Geddy Lee of RUSH……………..

    So where are Ian Paice & Roger Glover of DEEP PURPLE?!?!?!?

    Well let’s check out the Honourable Mentions:

    -Tony Williams & Ron Carter of MILES DAVIS
    -Peter Erskine & Jaco Pastorius of WEATHER REPORT
    -Mike Joyce & Andy Rourke of THE SMITHS
    -Rick Buckley & Bruce Foxton of THE JAM
    -Carter Beauford & Stefan Lessard of DAVE MATTEWS BAND
    -Mike “Puffy” Bordin & Billy Gould of FAITH NO MORE
    -Larry Mullen Jr. & Adam Clayton of U2
    -Vinnie Paul & Rex Brown of PANTERA
    -Stephen Adler & Duff McKagen of GUNS N ROSES
    -Dom Howard & Chris Wolstenholme of MUSE
    -Brian Downey & Phil Lynott of THIN LIZZY
    -Ben Johnston & James Johnston of BIFFY CLYRO
    -Tre Cool & Mike Dirnt of GREEN DAY
    -Abe Cunningham & Chi Cheng of DEFTONES
    -Steve White & Damon Minchella of THE PLAYERS / TRIO VALORE

    So once again, where are Ian Paice & Roger Glover of DEEP PURPLE?!?!?!?

    I couldn’t believe my eyes……I scoured the article back and forth a number of times to see if I had missed something. I scoured the magazine front to back and back to front several times, BUT no luck…..our Purple heroes have been completely been ignored, neglected, dissed, or whatever once more time.

    I thought the music media’s critical indifference, hostility, or whatever it is towards Deep Purple was largely a US based phenomenon. I see however that even in the UK Purple are sadly written out of the history books.

    Can someone please explain to me how such a travesty like this can occur???? What did Deep Purple do or not do to deserve such injustice??????

  10. 10
    Tracy Heyder (Zero the Hero) says:

    al @5:

    Please read my comment regarding that tune…..

    http://www.thehighwaystar.com/news/2013/06/07/hes-a-genius/comment-page-1/#comment-80001

    Ch-BeerZ?!

  11. 11
    cyclone says:

    #9 does not surprise me. DP gets the shaft again and again. I am waiting for the bad mouthing of the new album. The fans seem to love it as I know I do….but the media will make mince meat of it………………as for Paicey not making this list..ha-ha a joke like RRHOF.

  12. 12
    al says:

    @I agree with Mc Gregor than with you bud,but yeah there are similarities,but I still think it is not the same,Maybe Mr Blackmore “subconsciously” had that tune all along,or maybe he didn’t hear that song at all? Music is a strange thing! I think your love for the late Mr Moore making you a little biased,lol just kidding.I used to listen to Gary Moore,and I kind of got tired of him playing the blues and lost track of him after that since 1997 or 98 I find Blues very limited and I totally agree with Mr Blackmore on that !

    Cheers !

  13. 13
    T says:

    Re: #9

    Deeperpurps

    Thank you for compiling all that information. It is very interesting.

    As usual, the list is full of the popular, the trendy, the overrated, and the mediocre. Most are not even in Deep Purple’s league. This is all reminiscent of the situation regarding the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

    Deep Purple’s influence cannot be denied. Their longevity is practically unprecedented, and their influence virtually a how-to book for all others to follow.

    However, they never were a political band. They did not go out of their way to talk to the “right” people and back the “right” causes. Further, they avoided the hard drug scene (for the most part) and ignored label suggestions to dress a certain way or behave a certain way–particularly one guitarist that used to be in the band.

    I believe Purple paid for that. By not playing “the game,” they were put on the “fecal roster” and today have the reputation of not being team players.

    By sticking to their principles, the former and current members of Deep Purple do not receive the kudos that are due them. They simply never have been trendy enough to be included on these lists.

  14. 14
    MacGregor says:

    Whilst I don’t usually pay any attention to polls or the like, the drum & bass rhythm thing needs commenting on big time!
    Where is Bill Bruford & Chris Squire from Yes & also Alan White & Squire from the same band? Bruford & Tony Levin from 80’s King Crimson also, with these sort of mind blowing rhythm pairs left out, it really does show up exactly what it is! By the way, I do agree with Geddy Lee & Neil Peart of course being right up there. There are so many great drummers & bass players not in both of these lists.
    I could go on, but why bother!

  15. 15
    Ted The Mechanic says:

    Less we forget….

    Chris Squire and Bill Bruford
    Chris Squire and Alan White
    Jeff Berlin and Bill Bruford
    Tony Levin and any drummer he has played with….

    And the list goes on and on….

    Peace,
    Ted

  16. 16
    Ted The Mechanic says:

    @14 MacGregor,

    I swear your post was not apparent when I sent mine! :>

    Peace,
    Ted

  17. 17
    MacGregor says:

    Ted @ 16 – It was great to see you mention those guys also, our comments crossed over no doubt. I forgot about Bruford with Berlin, love that material also! I sort of feel like creating a list. Cheers

  18. 18
    Dave says:

    Ian Paice is one of the great drummers of all time. When I first heard him on The Who tribute album playing Bargain, I thought there was something incredibly special about it.

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